How to Defuse Emotions When Angry

How to Defuse Emotions When Angry

How to Defuse Emotions When Angry – After going through several stages of the filtering process, we are finally able to perfect the articles we have collected with data from reliable sources on how to relieve emotions when angry.

Feelings of annoyance and anger can come at any time and anywhere with various triggers. It could be due to traffic jams, clothes getting coffee stains at the office, or work problems and others. However, how to reduce emotions?

1. Take a deep breath
One great way to calm your emotions is to take deep breaths. Lecturer from Saint Louis University, United States Robert Nicholson, Ph.D stated that the body becomes tense when we are angry.

2. Listen to your favorite music
In fact, the internal rhythm of the body can follow the rhythm of the music we are listening to. Try listening to music when you are angry, listen to a soothing rhythm so that the body indirectly follows the rhythm. Note that your breathing and heart rate will slow back to normal, even more relaxed than before.

Also Read:Simple Ways to Shun the Mistakes of Others

3. On foot
Getting up from sitting and taking a walk away from the source of your anger may be an option to calm your emotions. No need to linger, walking for five minutes in an open space is enough to give you peace.

That way, you can think more clearly. In addition, this method can help you find new insights that can be a solution to the problem at hand.

4. Relax the muscles
You can relax all tense muscle groups. This method is easy and can be done at any time. This exercise can release almost any tension you feel in your body in seconds. This will make you much calmer and able to handle situations with a cool head.

You can stretch all the muscles in your body from head to toe. Move your shoulders back slowly, turn your neck clockwise or counterclockwise, relax your legs by turning them. Also, rotate your body to the right and left to relax your hips and back.

Simple Ways to Shun the Mistakes of Others

Simple Ways to Shun the Mistakes of Others

Simple Ways to Shun the Mistakes of Others – Forgiving the mistakes of others is the hardest thing that has ever happened, in fact it is also difficult for people who are considered good people. Basically letting go of other people’s mistakes can make ourselves feel better. For this reason, the following is an article on how to properly ignore people’s mistakes that have been summarized from trusted sources.
Wrong or mistake is something that is difficult to separate from our personality. No matter how much you have goodness, there must be times when you make mistakes in anything. No matter how hard you try to display perfection, there are still times when you make mistakes.

However, that does not mean that you become an eternal despicable human when you make mistakes. Heavy or light the mistakes, you still have the opportunity to improve your image and character.

When interacting with other people, you or they have the potential to do things they don’t like so that it is labeled a fatal mistake. Usually, the impact on the quality of your relationship that was initially close becomes tenuous. If today you are hurt, it could be that in the past or in the future you did the same thing accidentally.

So, how can we best respond to the mistakes of others towards us? Of course forgive him sincerely. Then, how do you make your heart volunteer? Come on, see the following reviews!

1. Remember that forgiving is like a winner

Trust me when you choose to be forgiving, you are the real winner. Conversely, people who don’t want to forgive other people’s mistakes are actually losers. Why? Even he had the same chance to hurt others accidentally. That is why we don’t need to involve grudges in social life.

Be forgiving and you have the right to hold you accountable in accordance with applicable laws or ethics.

2. Ignoring feelings of revenge that never solve the problem

Why are we forbidden to hold grudges? Because, revenge can kill ourselves slowly. Through feelings of hatred, subjectivity and anger that are not properly vented. Storing negative energy is harmful to physical health.

Besides that, even grudge can never solve the problem between you. Instead, narrowing the social space. Of course, life like this is uncomfortable.

3. Accepting hurt feelings is a way of maturing

Most people go through adulthood feeling hurt, betrayed, and at odds with other people. For a successful businessman, it is not surprising that he has experienced huge losses, abandoned by his teammates and large debts that must be borne alone.

Bitter experience became an expensive lesson so he was more careful in acting. But on the other hand, tough challenges will never be absent when approaching people who are getting older and the world they are exploring.

Also Read :How to Reduce People’s Anger

4. Forgiveness can calm the heart and mind

Forgiveness can calm the heart and mind as long as it is done sincerely. Positive attitudes make physically healthier and fitter because there is no burden to be stored. Being forgiving is one of them.
Because, at other times, you could just make the same mistake. That’s where you will learn how important it is to forgive. That you really need the willingness of the people you hurt.

5. Widen the space for socialization so that dark memories are not easily overwhelmed

When you are hurt, don’t stay locked up in your own room or world for long. Instead, multiply your relationships and friends from various backgrounds so that you have the opportunity to learn more about life.

The wider your social space, the more soul colors that enrich your experience. You will meet the character of people much better or worse. Each person will bring you a million valuable lessons.

So, those are some recommended ways so that you can sincerely forgive the mistakes of others. Good luck!

Deal With Emotions That Are Difficult To Get Rid Of

Deal-With-Emotions-That-Are-Difficult-To-Get-Rid-Of

Deal With Emotions That Are Difficult To Get Rid Of  – Emotions (feelings) are a normal and important part of our lives. Some emotions are positive. Think of happiness, joy, interest, curiosity, excitement, gratitude, love, and contentment. These positive emotions feel good. Negative emotions — like sadness, anger, loneliness, jealousy, self-criticism, fear, or rejection — can be difficult, even painful at times.

That’s especially true when we feel a negative emotion too often, too strongly, or we dwell on it too long.

Negative emotions are impossible to avoid, though. Everyone feels them from time to time. They may be difficult, but we can learn to handle them.

Here are three steps that can help you handle negative emotions.

Step 1: Identify the Emotion
Learning to notice and identify your feelings takes practice. In addition to focusing on your feelings, check in with your body, too. You may feel body sensations with certain emotions — perhaps your face gets hot, for example, or your muscles tense.

Be aware of how you feel. When you have a negative emotion, such as anger, try to name what you’re feeling.
For example:

  • That guy Ian in my study group makes me so mad!
  • I get so jealous when I see that girl/guy with my ex.
  • I feel afraid whenever I have to walk past those bullies.

Don’t hide how you feel from yourself. You might not want to broadcast your feelings to other people (like your ex, for example, or that guy in your study group who is making you mad). But don’t suppress your feelings entirely. Simply naming the feeling is a lot better than pretending not to have it — or exploding without thinking.

Know why you feel the way you do. Figure out what happened that got you feeling the way you do.

For example:

Whenever we do group projects, Ian finds a way to take all the credit for other people’s work.
Our teacher thinks Ian’s the star of the team, even though he never has his own ideas.
When I see my ex flirting with other people, it reminds me that I still have feelings for him/her.
Even though the bullies don’t pick on me, I see what they do to other people and it worries me.

Don’t blame. Being able to recognize and explain your emotions isn’t the same as blaming someone or something for the way you feel. Your ex probably isn’t seeing someone new as a way to get back at you, and the guy who takes credit for your work might not even realize what he is doing. How you feel when these things happen comes from inside you. Your feelings are there for a reason — to help you make sense of what’s going on.

Accept all your emotions as natural and understandable. Don’t judge yourself for the emotions you feel. It’s normal to feel them. Acknowledging how you feel can help you move on, so don’t be hard on yourself.

Step 2: Take Action
Once you’ve processed what you’re feeling, you can decide if you need to express your emotion. Sometimes it’s enough to just realize how you feel, but other times you’ll want to do something to feel better.

Think about the best way to express your emotion. Is this a time when you need to gently confront someone else? Talk over what you’re feeling with a friend? Or work off the feeling by going for a run?

For example:

It won’t solve anything to show my anger to Ian — it may even make him feel more superior! But my feelings tell me that I need to avoid getting in another situation where he takes control over a project.
I’ll hold my head high around my ex, then I’ll put on some sad songs and have a good cry in my room to help me release my feelings and eventually let go.
My fear of being around those bullies is a sign that they have gone too far. Perhaps I should talk about what’s going on with a school counselor.

Learn how to change your mood. At a certain point, you’ll want to shift from a negative mood into a positive one. Otherwise your thinking may get stuck on how bad things are, and that can drag you down into feeling worse. Try doing things that make you happy, even if you don’t feel like it at the time. For example, you might not be in the mood to go out after a breakup, but going for a walk or watching a funny movie with friends can lift you out of that negative space.

Build positive emotions. Positive feelings create a sense of happiness and well being. Make it a habit to notice and focus on what’s good in your life — even the little things, like the praise your dad gave you for fixing his bookshelves or how great the salad you made for lunch tastes. Noticing the good things even when you’re feeling bad can help you shift the emotional balance from negative to positive.

Seek support. Talk about how you’re feeling with a parent, trusted adult, or a friend. They can help you explore your emotions and give you a fresh way of thinking about things. And nothing helps you feel more understood and cared for than the support of someone who loves you for who you are.

Exercise. Physical activity helps the brain produce natural chemicals that promote a positive mood. Exercise also can release stress buildup and help you from staying stuck on negative feelings.

Step 3: Get Help With Difficult Emotions

Sometimes, no matter what you do, you can’t shake a tough emotion. If you find yourself stuck in feelings of sadness or worry for more than a couple of weeks, or if you feel so upset that you think you might hurt yourself or other people, you may need extra help.

Talk to a school counselor, parent, trusted adult, or therapist. Counselors and therapists are trained to teach people how to break out of negative emotions. They can provide lots of tips and ideas that will help you feel better.

Several Things Will Happen When You Save Your Emotions

Several-Things-Will-Happen-When-You-Save-Your-Emotions

The world has been telling you to bottle up your emotions your entire life. There’s no crying in baseball after all, right? But even though suppressing your emotions may spare others the discomfort of having to deal with your feelings, keeping it all on the inside can cause a hell of a lot of harm. Men, in particular, run the risk of exploding in rages as they finally unleash their pent-up emotions, and suffering long-term physical and psychological damage for failing to manage stress in a healthy way.

Here’s what happens when you suppress your emotions:

Your Stomach Twists Itself Into Knots

The chronic stress that comes from unresolved emotions can trigger your sympathetic nervous system’s fight or flight response, according to research from Harvard Medical School. This slows digestion, resulting in gas, bloating, constipation, vomiting, and, occasionally, ulcers.

Your Neck And Shoulders Scream From Stress

Head and neck pain are one of the most common symptoms of bottled up emotions, largely because the stress of holding back causes muscles in the jaw to tighten, Lawrence explains. Although there’s some debate among experts about how knots, or myofascial trigger points, are formed (or if they even exist), they are thought to be formed in part by overuse of muscles—perhaps from clenching your jaw.

You May Experience Headaches And Migraines

The corrugator muscles in the forehead and brow tighten in response to emotional stress, producing a frown, and a tight corrugator muscle is often a good indicator of stress throughout the entire body, psychologist Daniel Goleman told the New York Times. And when these muscles tighten, you may experience reduced blood flow to the brain — the perfect recipe for a splitting headache.

Stress Might Mess With Your Heart

When more complicated feelings of sadness and shame are buried they can explode in the form of one of the most primitive and destructive emotions of all — anger. This may put you at an increased risk of heart disease. This rage causes a rush of stress hormones that increase energy. But this burst of energy causes blood vessels to tighten as blood pressure increases, which can wear on artery walls over time, according to Web MD. In one study, the risk of heart attack was 8.5 times higher up to two hours after an extreme episode of anger and 9.5 times higher two hours after extreme anxiety. People prone to anger are nearly three times more likely to have heart attacks than those with lower anger, other data shows.

The problem with anger is that it’s a powerful emotion that tends to take over when other emotions are held in, Lawrence says. When it gets to that extreme people often mistakenly release it in aggressive ways that make them angrier and put their hearts in greater jeopardy.

“There are many ways to express our emotions that will make things worse such as yelling, throwing things, becoming physical, slamming doors,” she says. “Learning how to express emotions in a healthy manner is key.”

Control My Anger And Get Rid Of Anger

Control-My-Anger-And-Get-Rid-Of-Anger

Control My Anger And Get Rid Of Anger – Anger tells us we need to take action to put something right. It gives us strength and energy, and motivates us to act. But for some people, anger can get out of control and cause problems with relationships, work and even the law.

Long-term, unresolved anger is linked to health conditions such as high blood pressure, depression, anxiety and heart disease. It’s important to deal with anger in a healthy way that doesn’t harm you or anyone else.

How common are anger problems?

In a survey by the Mental Health Foundation, 32% of people said they had a close friend or family member who had trouble controlling their anger and 28% of people said they worry about how angry they sometimes feel.

Even though anger problems can have such a harmful effect on our family, work and social lives, most people who have them don’t ask for help. In the same survey by the Mental Health Foundation, 58% of people said they didn’t know where to seek help.

Sometimes people don’t recognise that their anger is a problem for themselves and for other people. They may see other people or things as the problem instead.

What makes people angry?

Anger is different for everyone. Things that make some people angry don’t bother others at all. But there are things that make lots of us feel angry, including:

  • being treated unfairly and feeling powerless to do anything about it
  • feeling threatened or attacked
  • other people not respecting your authority, feelings or property
  • being interrupted when you are trying to achieve a goal
  • stressful day to day things such as paying bills or rush hour traffic

Anger can also be a part of grief. If you are struggling to come to terms with losing someone close to you, the charity Cruse Bereavement Care Scotland can help.

How we react to anger

How you react to feeling angry depends on lots of things, including:

  • the situation you are in at the moment – if you’re dealing with lots of problems or stress in your life, you may find it harder to control your anger
  • your family history – you may have learned unhelpful ways of dealing with anger from the adults around you when you were a child
  • events in your past – if you have experienced events that made you angry but felt you couldn’t express your anger, you may still be coping with those angry feelings

Some people express anger verbally, by shouting. Sometimes this can be aggressive, involving swearing, threats or name-calling.

Some people react violently and lash out physically, hitting other people, pushing them or breaking things. This can be particularly damaging and frightening for other people.

Some of us show anger is passive ways, for example, by ignoring people or sulking.

Other people may hide their anger or turn it against themselves. They can be very angry on the inside but feel unable to let it out.

People who tend to turn anger inwards may harm themselves as a way of coping with the intense feelings they have. Young people are most likely to self harm.

The difference between anger and aggression

Some people see anger and aggression as the same thing. In fact, anger is an emotion that we feel while aggression is how some of us behave when we feel angry.

Not everyone who feels angry is aggressive, and not everyone who acts aggressively is angry. Sometimes people behave aggressively because they feel afraid or threatened.

Read more about anxiety, fear and controlling your anger.

Alcohol and some illegal drugs can make people act more aggressively.

If uncontrolled anger leads to domestic violence, or threatening behaviour within your home, talk to your GP or contact a domestic violence organisation such as Refuge, Scottish Women’s Aid, Abused Men in Scotland, The LGBT Domestic Abuse Project or Survivor Scotland.

How can I handle my anger better?
For more advice on dealing with anger, you can:

read about how to control your anger
download the Mental Health Foundation’s Cool Down: anger and how to deal with it leaflet
visit Mind’s website for tips from the charity on dealing with anger in a healthy way